Sequential Underground #22 - Scrapped Projects

Sequential Underground

The podcast by indie comics creators for indie comics creators scraps it out!

We kick off the festivities with a call in from Ben Beesly a.k.a. Beeslo. Then we dive into tales of our scrapped projects! Shawn has a dead project that was a combination of Three Stooges and Reservoir Dogs, and Seth discusses his Lost in Space meets the Odd Couple project -- Small Man in Big World -- that was a stillborn story.

Nick talks about the long evolution of his scrapped projects -- Jared Cohen: Supervillain, Evil Andy, and Evil Dick -- and how they turned into his realized project, Zombie Palin. Shawn discusses how his scrapped college project led to his ongoing comic, Explorers of the Unknown.

Then Nick gives advice by relating his experience about two scrapped projects that led to the creation of Super Haters -- don't get discouraged if something gets scrapped! Be patent and wait for the right time. You never know when the time will be right. Shawn agrees -- don't scrap your ideas. Can them so they can ferment and get more delicious.

NEXT: Unconventional influences! (Listen to this episode for a special preview of our upcoming topic, as Seth relates his incredible Laser Wolf creation story.)

7 Responses to “Sequential Underground #22 - Scrapped Projects”


  1. 1 Justin

    Just listened to the SU and left a comment regarding my scrapped project(indefinitely postponed). Also I know who Fronz was sitting with when Laser Wolf was born. It was me we were at the Barrow Civic Theater in Franklin, PA.

  2. 2 nick marino

    hahaha NICE! the mystery friend reveals himself!!!

  3. 3 nick marino

    Justin, listening to your message right now!!!

  4. AudioShocker Shoutouts!

    VACANT webcomics


  5. 4 Dan

    Great episode guys. Once again, sorry I couldn't participate, but I thought I'd mention my thoughts/experiences with scrapped projects. My first one, the first real comic idea I had, was called Covenant. It centered around a shadow agency that employed individuals with special abilities to deal with unusual problems(it was very BPRD-ish).

    With the help of Brian Babyok & Scott Hedlund, I prepared a prequel mini-comic and debuted it at the 2005(?) Pittsburgh Comicon. Suffice to say, it was ROUGH. I cringe looking at it now, but it was a good springboard for the full-length comic I was planning. I had the first issue thumbnailed and started to pencil and ink it. In fact, I have 3-4 pages done.

    I'm not sure when it happened or why, but at some point, I put Covenant on hold. I have a feeling that I kept looking at it as a long-term project that was going to take a while to complete and I wanted a more short-term and immediate satisfaction with my comic work.

    At this point, I don't know when or if I'll return to Covenant. When I think about it now, if someone suggested it to me, it doesn't seem like the kind of project I would want to work on. I may cannibalize some characters or story ideas for Blue Wraith, but I think that's as close as I'll come.

  6. 5 nick marino

    It sounds awesome and really ambitious, so I can see why it would have been a daunting project to tackle. I'd still love to see the pages and promo, though, regardless of how cringe-worthy you think it is.

    Also, hearing your experience led me to a mainstream vs. indie comics thought tangent -- something I love about mainstream comics (that I rarely find in indie work) is long-form narrative that creates a plot thread and subtly spins it into a larger and larger story over the course of a couple of years, using disparate characters and situations to advance the plot.

    And the reason why I think that tends to be more native to mainstream work is because indie stuff simply isn't able to achieve the same sort of scale. Not scale in terms of story itself or scale in terms of reader emotion, but scale in terms of time and "spread" (for lack of a better word). By time I mean the fact that you know Avengers is going to be around in five years. You can launch a plot thread and have it pay off years down the line. With an indie book being made by only a couple of people, you rarely have that luxury. By "spread" I'm referring to the situational resources at your disposal -- for example, you know that Avengers, Iron Man, Cap, X-Men, and Ms. Marvel will all exist in one form or another in 5 tears, and you can use that wide, wide range of titles/characters to drip a small plot thread and eventually let it boil over in five different places.

    I know I'm not dropping a huge revelation right there... but I think it's a point worthy of making, that the indie comics creator not only lacks financial resources when starting out but also lacks time and "spread" (supposing that said indie creator desires those things, which many don't -- but I do!!!).

  7. 6 shawn atkins

    @nick but don't you think with the coming of web comics you can do such story lines that will take a awhile to build, course you are right about one thing in 5 years there will be avengers comic,and maybe not your favorite indie comic. hopefully this will change in coming years.i would love to see long form stories not orchestrated by a committee like the big two. (i hope this makes sense)

  8. AudioShocker Shoutouts!

    Wet Moon comics


  9. 7 nick marino

    you have a good point, for sure. the internet makes it way easier to take care of the time aspect. but i'm not sure if the "spread" is there. well, except for you, shawn!!! BUT NOT EVERYONE HAS MULTIPLE ONGOING WEBCOMICS LIKE YOU!!

  1. 1 The Comics Podcast Network » Sequential Underground #22
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